APRIL 22 // 2017

It’s been 6 days since I have showered. Not really bothered about it. In fact I smell Fantastic. Literally. I’ve been spraying myself with Fantastic.

What’s been worse is that it’s taken 6 days for the sun to shine. When the temperatures rise above 40F, sunshine feels like god. Today sunshine is god. It is Earth Day after all. I could go on and on about how cold it’s been this week…let me rephrase – how arctic it’s been this week. I don’t care for anyone to worry about or sympathize for the crew and me, so I will spare you the weather details because it’s boring and that’s what people talk about in elevators. I will say it once and be done with it… from frosty decks to snow flurries and 20 knot winds out of the north I am happy to be alive today. Happy to get a few freckles. Happy to gain a few wrinkles. Wrinkle me up, make me a raisin. And when I am older, leathered, and decorated with cavernous wrinkles – I will remember today.

Monday morning, April 17 we waved Northport goodbye. Jason Thibedeau my (right hand sailor), Cody Brown the (deck bitch), and Mallori Sheets our (galley dude) courageously on board as team-mates until we reach Detroit. Each of us hyper, myself in particular with red-bull wings. I don’t know if my crew understood what this week was going to be like. I don’t know if I understood either. Together we would figure it out.

“It’s just a lake” as my fiancée Luke likes to say, purposefully angering us Great Lakers. I stood there at the helm, Northport got smaller and smaller and I thought to myself “It’s just a lake. It’s just a lake. It’s just a lake.”

For seven days, three humans looked to me for answers, for direction, and to make good decisions. I’ve never been a captain before. Only a co-captiain. The hazards that go along with sailing through the Great Lakes in the middle of April begin with 37 degree water temps, freezing nights, arctic and unpredictable winds, harbors that have yet to be dredged, buoys and markers that have yet to be placed. My crew was trusting me. I was trusting Desirée.

I have felt heavily weighted with responsibility this week. To keep the boat safe. To keep the crew safe. To make smart decisions. To understand my experience level and stay within those regions. I’ve exited those regions a few times this week merely because there is nothing sensible about sailing the Great Lakes this time of year. I’ve kept my chin up, been a bit ambitious, a bit exhausted and am grateful for the three people keeping my morale high and to have push-up, dip, and plank competitions with me just to stay warm. Did you know that the world record for holding plank is 8 hours and 1 minute? Seriously. Two minute plank in a rocking cockpit and I thought I was going to die.

I didn’t cry when we waved goodbye. Which I kind of expected to. I can be such a child in that way. Not ashamed. Okay, Mallori may have caught me glassy eyed. But I will admit to crying the day before, Sunday afternoon the 16th. It was unexpected. The Wizard was helping me rig up the mizzen. He knew it was our last day together for some time. He was calm. Giving me diligent direction and walking me through yet another hourly lesson. All of the work, all the time, the money, the persistence… it extracted a puddle of water from somewhere unknown in my body and shoved it out of my eyes. I just couldn’t believe what he had done to make this happen for Luke and me. I couldn’t believe he was letting me take his boat. His Desirée. I lost it. I thanked him. I told him I loved him. I wiped my eyes dry. And that was it. We carried on rigging the mizzen boom.

Day one :  Covered 65 miles with light headwind and anchored off of St. Helena island just west of the Mackinac Bridge.

Day two :  Woke up to hoist the anchor in 25 degree temps and frosty decks. Took Jason and myself to get the anchor on deck while we ice skated on deck. Tacked into 20 knot head winds and 5 foot waves while passing under the Mac bridge. Called it quits after 25 miles of hell because the weather continued to build. Docked in Cheboygan.

Day three : Ran downwind 96 miles to Alpena. Trying to cover 96 miles in daylight was a questionable maneuver. Huge rollers and 20 knot wind at our back was humbling. A few accidental jibes, and a handful of engine issues as it continued to shut off. To say I was nervous every minute of that day is an understatement. We prepared to dock under sail just after sunset, but decided to bleed the fuel lines one last time, got her fired up and she stayed on.

Day four : Waited out nasty weather in Alpena Marina. Heavy sleet and 30 knot winds all day.  Bled a bunch more air from the fuel lines. Went on a mad mission to top off water and diesel tanks. Found a bar to self medicate. Befriended Aplena Locals.

Day five : Made a run to Port Austin, 65 miles and across Saginaw bay. Bitter cold. Never warmed up despite desperate attempt to exercise in cockpit. Beam reaching all day, Desireé was happily balanced. The auto-pilot, whom I have yet to name drove us the entire way.

Day six : Today. 85 mile run to the mouth of St. Clair River. The sun shines. Wind is at our back. Wing on wing (two dogs f&$i*g as Katie and I used to call it)  Everyone has energy. Mallori prepared us a full pancake, egg, and bacon breakfast. Cody is dancing on the bow with a cocktail. Jason is basking in the sun. I can’t sit still. I am feeling wildly motivated. Motivated enough to write a few things down for the first time this week. I’m warm. I mounted our super sexy B&G chart plotter and geeked out over first use of the AIS when we saw ships.

It already requires focus to piece the days together. It took one week to remember what it means to simply exist on a boat. Only a handful of things matter. Food, water, shelter and Luke’s favorite quote, “Take care of the boat and the boat will take care of you”. He is right. His little obnoxious comments sit on my shoulder as if he himself is sitting there. Which must be the case cause my shoulders are sore and I don’t know why. I am sad he is not able to be here for this epic delivery to the sea and I know he is too. All of this is for him. Because of him. For us.

The crew and I have found our rhythm. Jason sweats positivity. He breathes gratitude. He understands sailing. Together we discuss scenarios and situations. He helms with confidence. Cody became a sailor for the first time this week. He holds a course like a boss. When he is not busy being the easiest going guy I have ever known, he shocks us all with a wild dance move. Mallori and I became sisters this week. She took over the galley. Prepped meals, and cooked in shitty conditions. She is the cutest button who flew all the way back from California to be freezing cold with me.

I am really proud of everyone. I don’t want them to leave.

Satisfied from the inside out.

My next crew arrives Monday in Detroit… AKA the Spice Girl crew (starring Katie Smith)

Next leg – Lake Erie & Welland Canal.

It’s just a lake. It’s just a lake. It’s just a lake.

On the edge of my seat and paying attention at all times.

One eye is always open.

I can’t believe I am where I am. Doing what I am doing. Going where I am going.

P.S. Just because the following photos depict rainbows and butterflies doesn’t mean that it is always butterflies and rainbows. But every once and a while – it is.

18 thoughts on ““It’s just a lake”

  1. Have you reached Detroit yet? I’m just a half hour away and my wife and I will buy you dinner!

    On Mon, Apr 24, 2017 at 12:26 PM, KATIE AND JESSIE ON A BOAT wrote:

    > katieandjessieonaboat posted: ” APRIL 22 // 2017 It’s been 6 days since I > have showered. Not really bothered about it. In fact I smell Fantastic. > Literally. I’ve been spraying myself with Fantastic. What’s been worse is > that it’s taken 6 days for the sun to shine. When the tem” >

  2. You managed to capture the psychological and emotional pressure of being captain of a small vessel with a crew. The use of imagery to describe your crew provided a good glimpse into the personality of each. A great read…thanks.

  3. Katie
    Fantastic writing and pictures as usual. I have my boat in Muskegon now and bought it years ago in Ohio. I brought it home in May and it your account brought back fantastic memories, ones I will never forget.
    I have been following since the beginning and wish I could have heard you speak and ask questions at one of your engagements.
    Thank you , and look forward to hearing about the whole trip.

  4. Great stuff. I’m sure the wizard couldn’t tell you without weeping uncontrollably but he is humbled and proud beyond measure.
    My girls dad.

  5. Thanks for sending the info, you will do just fine, I understand the deep thoughts you think of, sorta been their and done that, you are a great writer!! tom

    On Mon, Apr 24, 2017 at 9:26 AM, KATIE AND JESSIE ON A BOAT wrote:

    > katieandjessieonaboat posted: ” APRIL 22 // 2017 It’s been 6 days since I > have showered. Not really bothered about it. In fact I smell Fantastic. > Literally. I’ve been spraying myself with Fantastic. What’s been worse is > that it’s taken 6 days for the sun to shine. When the tem” >

  6. Jess, I shivered when initially learning the date you were leaving Northport. Reading of your first 7 days, I grabbed a blanket!! Also congratulations from your shipboard menu progressing from opening cold cans of food!!!! Life is good! Celebrate the Day!

  7. We are following your adventure with envy. Way too cold out there for Grampa Dave. Keep it coming and be safe

  8. Jessie,
    You are my hero/heroine?:) Can you imagine your mother and me on this first leg? Nope! Neither can I! The two sisters would be huddled under blankets with HUGE cups of wine!! Seriously, so proud of you and ole Granddad Eliot would be over the moon with your sailing know how and adventurous spirit! In fact, listen hard some night in the middle of the Atlantic and he will be with you, using what the old timers knew – celestial navigation. Uncle Mike and I are with you, too … all the way … Godspeed:)
    Love,
    Auntie Midge

  9. You guys are such an inspiration. My family and I (we have zero experience) recently acquired an Ingrid ketch and are getting her shipshape. You make it seem possible and reasonable to just go. Thank you. Keep up the awesome details!

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